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2 edition of The noun phrase in romance and germanic found in the catalog.

The noun phrase in romance and germanic

Antonia Petronella Sleeman

The noun phrase in romance and germanic

structure, variation, and change

by Antonia Petronella Sleeman

  • 25 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by John Benjamins Pub. Co. in Amsterdam, Philadelphia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Comparative and general Grammar,
  • Noun phrase,
  • Linguistic change,
  • Syntax

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by Petra Sleeman, Harry Perridon
    SeriesLinguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today -- 171
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsP271 .N6794 2011
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 283 p. :
    Number of Pages283
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24893258M
    ISBN 109789027255549, 9789027287298
    LC Control Number2010045313

    From NP to DP: Volume 2: The expression of possession in noun phrases Edited by Martine Coene and Yves D’hulst. From NP to DP Volume 2: The expression of possession in noun No part of this book may be reproduced in any form, by print, photoprint, microfilm, or Romance languages like French, on the other is not clear-cut and that espe. A noun phrase is a group of two or more words that is headed by a noun (a person, place, or thing) and includes modifiers (e.g., 'the,' 'a,' 'of them,' 'with her'). A noun phrase plays the role of a noun. In a noun phrase, the modifiers can come before or after the noun. A noun phrase can function as a subject, an object, or a complement within a sentence.

      Germanic - one of the largest sub-groups of the Indo-European language family - comprises 37 languages with an estimated million speakers worldwide. This book presents a comparative linguistic survey of the full range of Germanic languages, both ancient and modern, including major world languages such as English and German (West Germanic), the Scandinavian (North Germanic 5/5(1). Comparative studies in word order variation: adverbs, pronouns, and clause structure in Romance and Germanic. [Christopher Laenzlinger] -- The present book is a typological study in crucial portions of the grammars of French/Romance and German/Germanic.

    Without an accompanying noun, as in mine is red, I prefer yours, this book is his. A possessive used in this way is called a substantive possessive pronoun or an absolute pronoun. Some languages, including English, also have possessive forms derived from nouns or noun phrases.   In this paper, I provide examples from Germanic of cyclical changes involving the nominal phrase. Using a DP structure, it can be observed that demonstratives in specifier positions of the DP are reanalyzed through time as articles in head by:


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The noun phrase in romance and germanic by Antonia Petronella Sleeman Download PDF EPUB FB2

: The Noun Phrase in Romance and Germanic: Structure, variation, and change (Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today) (): Petra Sleeman, Harry Perridon: Books Skip to main content Try Prime.

One of the recurrent questions in historical linguistics is to what extent languages can borrow grammar from other languages. This title sheds light on the question of what is similar and what is different in the structure of the noun phrase of the various Romance and Germanic languages and dialects, and what causes this similarity or : The Syntax of Noun Phrases: Configuration, Parameters and Empty Categories (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics) this book provides a descriptive analysis of nominal structure in Romance languages, compares it with corresponding structure in Germanic languages, and offers an introduction to Italian phrase by: 2.

The noun phrase in Germanic and Romance: Common developments and differences (by Perridon, Harry) Part I. Variation Scaling the variation in Romance and Germanic nominalizations (by Alexiadou, Artemis) What all happens when a universal quantifier combines with an interrogative DP (by Cirillo, Robert) (English) In: The Noun PHrase in Romance and Germanic: Structure, variation and change / [ed] Petra Sleeman & Harry Perridon, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publ.

Comp.,p. Chapter in book (Refereed) Abstract [en] This article deals The noun phrase in romance and germanic book the relation between the structure and semantics of noun phrases.

Two complexes of meaning are taken to be grammatically derived in noun phrases. Adjectives in Germanic and Romance. Vol. Issue., p. CrossRef; Google Scholar; The most common noun phrases in many languages contain a single word which is either a noun or a pronoun.

In most if not all languages, pronouns generally occur alone in noun phrases without modifiers. Email your librarian or administrator to Cited by: minerless noun phrases in contexts where Germanic and Romance languages will Romance and Germanic) generally correspond to verbal phrases.

I will refer to these as adjectival verb. 2 The Morphosyntax of the Noun Phrase 15 constructions (cf. Wetzer ). Using Gungbe as illustration, contrast the exampleFile Size: KB. book. • Since these can be thought of as partitives (part of the set of books), you could make a partitive case that is separate from genitive case.

Cardinality with Numerical Classifier. • One person student • One person of student • Student(‘s) one person • Student(‘s) person one • Two person(s) of student (s).

The Morphosyntax of the Leteh1 Simple Noun Phrase This paper describes how elements constituting the Leteh simple noun phrase are Romance and Germanic languages require noun heads to occur with determiners. A study done by Hawkins ( 2) on the ordering of nominal modifiers stated that languages book.’ In the double object clause File Size: KB.

further research into the fine grained structure of DPs. Degree phrases such ** W ea rg t fu l ohd inc sE S-9 (A), yx b U v Cambridge) and Variation and Change in the Romance and Germanic Noun Phrase (Amsterdam) and to Eva Engels for comments and suggestions.

In this introductory chapter the similarities and differences in the development and the current behavior of the adjective in Germanic and Romance, both within and between the language families, are discussed.

A deeper analysis suggests that what seem to be. Corver & M. van Koppen, P. Sleeman & H. Perridon(): The Noun Phrase in Romance and Germanic: Structure, variation and change Scientific article M. van Koppen (samen met J. van Craenenbroeck)(): Theorie, empirie en subjectverdubbeling: een antwoord op Haegeman ().

The noun phrase in Germanic and romance: common developments and differences / Harry Perridon, Petra Sleeman --Scaling the variation in romance and Germanic nominalizations / Artemis Alexiadou, Gianina Iordăchioaia, Florian Schäfer --What all happens when a universal quantifier combines with ain interrogative DP / Robert Cirillo --Micro-diversity in Dutch interrogative DPs.

The functional structure of noun phrases:1 A bare phrase structure approach Giuliana Giusti determiners, particularly in Romance, Germanic and Balkan languages, which can shed. This book examines the syntax of direct object noun phrases in English within the Principles and Parameters, specifically Chomsky's Minimalist Program, approachCited by: New Perspectives on Bare Noun Phrases in Romance and Beyond Johannes Kabatek, Albert Wall This book envisions the study of bare noun phrases as a field of research in its own right rather than an accessory matter in the wider domain of nominal determination.

Those Germanic words listed below with a Frankish source mostly came into English through Anglo-Norman, and so despite ultimately deriving from Proto-Germanic, came to English through a romance language (and many have cognates in modern romance languages).

This results in some Germanic doublets, such as yard and garden, through Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman respectively. Margaret Cargill and Patrick O'Connor This kind of noun phrase can cause problems for EAL [English as an additional language] writers, in our experience.

An example of a noun-noun phrase is 'resource availability.' This phrase means 'availability of resources.' To shorten phrases like this, it is very common in scientific English for the second part (of resources) to be moved in front of the Author: Richard Nordquist.

There are a lot of differences between both. In fact there has been a language of origin that is called 'Indo-European. Lots of languages derived of it. You can look at it as if it was a tree. One branch on the tree is 'German languages'(German. The Noun Phrase in Romance and Germanic: Structure, variation, and change Book One of the recurrent questions in historical linguistics is to what extent languages can borrow grammar from other languages.

German words for romance include Romantik, Romanze, Roman, Liebesgeschichte, Liebesroman, Abenteuerroman, fabulieren, Ritterromanze, phantasieren and fantasieren.‘English is a Germanic Language.’ What does this mean, and how true is it?

Rory Byrne In order to answer this question some clarification is needed: for the purposes of this essay ‘English’ will be taken to mean Modern English (ModE) — as used in spoken and File Size: KB.This is a standard way to name individual works in a loosely-linked series; it is currently most common in childrens' books.

Frequently the noun phrase in question will be of The X of Y form. A common variant is to use the possessive instead of "and the", giving Character Name's Noun Phrase or Character Name and his Noun Phrase.